Free and open-source software – Wikipedia

Country Description  Brazil In 2006, the Brazilian government has simultaneously encouraged the distribution of cheap computers running Linux throughout its poorer communities by subsidizing their purchase with tax breaks.  Ecuador In April 2008,[57] Ecuador passed a similar law, Decree 1014, designed to migrate the public sector to Libre Software.[58]  France In March 2009, the French Gendarmerie Nationale announced it will totally switch to Ubuntu by 2015. The Gendarmerie began its transition to open source software in 2005 when it replaced Microsoft Office with OpenOffice.org across the entire organization. In September 2012, the French Prime Minister laid down a set of action-oriented recommendations about using open-source in the French public administration.[60] These recommendations are published in a document based on the works of an inter-ministerial group of experts.[61] This document stops some orientations like establishing an actual convergence on open-source stubs, activating a network of expertise about converging stubs, improving the support of open-source software, contributing to selected stubs, following the big communities, spreading alternatives to the main commercial solutions, tracing the use of open-source and its effects, developing the culture of use of the open-source licenses in the developments of public information systems. One of the aim of this experts groups is also to establish lists of recommended open-source software to use in the French public administration.[62]  Germany In the German City of Munich, conversion of 15,000 PCs and laptops from Microsoft Windows-based operating systems to a Debian-based Linux environment called LiMux spanned the ten years of 2003 to 2013. After successful completion of the project, more than 80% of all computers were running Linux.[63] On November 13, 2017 The Register reported that Munich was planning to revert to Windows 10 by 2020.[64] But in 2020, Munich decided to shift back from Microsoft to Linux again.[65]  India The Government of Kerala, India, announced its official support for FOSS software in its State IT Policy of 2001,[66][discuss] which was formulated after the first-ever Free software conference in India, Freedom First!, held in July 2001 in Trivandrum, the capital of Kerala. In 2009, Government of Kerala started the International Centre for Free and Open Source Software (ICFOSS).[67] In March 2015 the Indian government announced a policy on adoption of FOSS.[69]  Italy The Italian military is transitioning to LibreOffice and the OpenDocument Format (ODF). The Ministry of Defence will over the next year-and-a-half install this suite of office productivity tools on some 150,000 PC workstations – making it Europe’s second largest LibreOffice implementation. The switch was announced on September 15, 2015, by the LibreItalia Association.[70] By June 23, 2016, 6 thousand stations have been migrated.[71] E-learning military platform.[72]  Jordan In January 2010, the Government of Jordan announced a partnership with Ingres Corporation (now named Actian), an open source database management company based in the United States, to promote open-source software use, starting with university systems in Jordan.[73]  Malaysia Malaysia launched the “Malaysian Public Sector Open Source Software Program”, saving millions on proprietary software licenses until 2008.[74][75]  Peru In 2005 the Government of Peru voted to adopt open source across all its bodies. The 2002 response to Microsoft’s critique is available online. In the preamble to the bill, the Peruvian government stressed that the choice was made to ensure that key pillars of democracy were safeguarded: “The basic principles which inspire the Bill are linked to the basic guarantees of a state of law.”[77]  Uganda In September 2014, the Uganda National Information Technology Authority (NITA-U) announced a call for feedback on an Open Source Strategy & Policy[78] at a workshop in conjunction with the ICT Association of Uganda (ICTAU).  Venezuela In 2004, a law in Venezuela (Decree 3390) went into effect, mandating a two-year transition to open source in all public agencies. As of June 2009, the transition was still under way.[82][83][

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